Modern Film: The '80s and Beyond

Friends with Potential: A Brief Look at Cameron Crowe’s “Say Anything”

“Maybe I didn’t really know you. Maybe you were just a mirage. Maybe the world is full of food and sex and spectacle and we’re all just hurling towards an apocalypse, in which case it’s not your fault…” – Lloyd Dobler to Diane Court, via her answering machine

I’d like to begin this post by simply saying: Thank you, Cameron Crowe (Almost FamousJerry Maguire), for creating this masterpiece of a film.

Say Anything (1989) is a romantic comedy starring John Cusack and Ione Skye that’s most famous for the scene in which Lloyd Dobler (Cusack) raises a boombox over his head blasting the quintessential ’80s movie love song “In Your Eyes” by Peter Gabriel in hopes that he will win back his ex-girlfriend’s heart.

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Lloyd Dobler and Diane Court are fresh out of high school…and strangers to one another. Well, that’s not completely true; Lloyd has been in love with Diane, the most popular and academically-gifted girl at his school, for a long time. Diane doesn’t really know much about Lloyd, despite the fact that they ate lunch by each other at the mall once, a fact that Lloyd proudly remembers years later. Unlike Diane, he doesn’t have a master plan for his future, although he thinks kick-boxing (“the sport of the future”) looks like a promising ambition.

Lloyd takes a chance right after graduation: he calls the girl of his dreams and asks her out.

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(courtesy of fanpop.com)

Well, what do you think happens next? She takes a chance and agrees to attend a big party with him.

Lloyd Dobler defies the “hot guy of the ’80s” thing. Although both scenarios can be considered pretty cliche, Say Anything is clever enough to dodge the cliche-bomb. Lloyd and Diane are three-dimensional characters and so is Diane’s supporting but troubled father, portrayed by John Mahoney (four years before his debut on Frasier).

Say Anything wears its feelings on its sleeve. The chemistry between Lloyd Dobler and Diane Court is red-hot while somehow remaining charmingly innocent. There’s a scene toward the beginning of Lloyd and Diane’s relationship that shows Lloyd helping out at the nursing home owned by Diane’s father. Diane volunteers her time to help take care of the residents. After her shift ends, they decide to hang out and grab some coffee, where they decide to be “friends with potential”. Then, Lloyd takes Diane out and teaches her how to drive. As they bond over it, their potential comes through quicker than expected. It’s a really sweet moment:

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One of the other bits that stands out to me is the scene which takes place the morning after Lloyd and Diane attend the party together. After they drop off the last remaining (and totally wasted) party guest, they wander into a 7-Eleven before Lloyd drops Diane off at her house. As the leave walk through the parking lot,  Lloyd stops Diane before she steps on a pile of glass, brushes it away with his shoe, and then proceeds to walk, making sure the rest of Diane’s path is safe. The simple but sweet gesture doesn’t go unnoticed by Diane, either, who cites it as one of the reasons why she really likes Lloyd.

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John Mahoney does an outstanding job in the role of Diane’s father. The big subplot involving a dark secret kept by Mr. Court is played out well between Mahoney and Skye.

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Say Anything is available to watch in various formats – it’s super cheap to purchase on DVD from Amazon – so please, please, please sit down for all 100 minutes and soak in all of its greatness if you haven’t watched it. Or re-watch it if you haven’t seen it in awhile.

 

 

Modern Film: The '80s and Beyond, musicals

La La Land: Here’s to the Ones Who Dream ♪

“People love what other people are passionate about.”

In the course of two days, I’ve seen La La Land twice (so far). I figured I’d enjoy it, but I didn’t know that I’d love it as much as I do. I’m already binge-listening to the soundtrack.

Directed by Damien Chazelle, the film was recently released in theaters worldwide and has become a hit. The project was a tough feat for Chazelle to get off the ground, but he got it off the ground and ran with it all the way. Like the films it pays homage to, La La Land is a dish of escapism with a bittersweet garnish on top. It introduces us to two characters (portrayed by Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone) who are young adults living in Los Angeles. Both are ambitious dreamers who are struggling to find a steady career in the fields that they’re passionate about: acting (her) and jazz (him).

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The opening song and dance sequence was filmed on the ramp connecting the 105 and 110 Interstates in LA. The crew had them closed down for two days in summer 2015 to shoot it.

As previously mentioned, this film is a love letter to the bubbly and lavish Technicolor musicals of the Golden Age of Hollywood. Now that it’s showing in theaters across the globe, scores of people – many who have never watched a black & white movie – are, in some shape or form, being introduced to classic film. That may seem like a stretch to say that, but I really mean it. Which brings me to this:

There are so many references made by the characters and the film itself:

  • The movie opens with the CinemaScope logo, a camera lense used often in the 1950s and ’60s. Films shot on CinemaScope were presented in its special widescreen formatting.

Movies shot in CinemaScope began with a logo similar to this one:


  • Main characters Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) watch Rebel Without a Cause (1955) at the old Rialto Theatre. Their reason for going, they both claim, is for research purposes. The looks on their faces suggest otherwise. After their date concludes (it was totally a date), Sebastian and Mia make an impromptu visit to the Griffith Observatory, which is seen in Rebel.

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  • The dreamlike dance sequence inside the Griffith Observatory’s Planetarium is, in a word, enchanting. That scene, along with a couple of other scenes, reminded me of the ballet sequences that were popular in musical films of the 1950s – think An American in Paris and Oklahoma!.

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  • Mia has classic film posters on many of the walls in her apartment. As seen on the left side of the photo below, she has a huge mural of Ingrid Bergman’s face splashed on the wall beside her bed. Also, note the posters hanging up on the right side of the photo. The Black Cat is a 1941 comedic horror film, Lilies of the Field (1924) is a lost silent film, and The Dove is a silent film starring Norma Talmadge, released in 1927. I can’t figure out what movie the poster hanging up by Ingrid Bergman is from. Also, that wallpaper. ❤
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(photo courtesy of Dale Robinette / Lionsgate)

  • When Sebastian tap dances with Mia in a romantic scene, he pulled off a couple of moves that made me think he must have hardcore studied Gene Kelly’s work.
  • One of Sebastian’s prize possessions is an old stool that was signed by music legend and occasional classic film character actor Hoagy Carmichael.

  • The soundtrack is made up of a mixture of old-fashioned instrumental jazz music and pure Golden Age of Hollywood-inspired show tunes.

A few more personal thoughts on the film: 

La La Land captures the heart with its pure optimism and tug-at-your-heartstrings moments. While some may see its premise as unrealistic and saccharine, I believe that it shouldn’t be overthought. Just enjoy it for its escapism. God knows we don’t get enough high-quality film musical escapism today.


On an extra personal note, I want to thank La La Land for making me feel feelings – all kinds of feelings. Lately, I’ve found myself thinking so many negative thoughts because of some personal life stuff and politics. The second time I watched the film, it really got me. To a degree, I understood how both of the main characters were feeling – the uncertainty of where life is leading you, but feeling incredibly excited to just be alive. And I felt more alive than ever when I watched the opening number – the idea of having fun in LA traffic! (Cheesy, I know.) It made me even more excited for my next journey to Los Angeles this April. (I can’t dance, so I won’t subject any poor souls to seeing scene recreations in Griffith Park.)

And this movie celebrates classic film while doing its own thing…My heart is full.

When I sat down and watched this movie, everything became brighter. I fell into this Technicolor-inspired world of exciting passion and remembered that Passion. Is. Everything. By the end of the movie, I was amazed at how many emotions it brought to me.

And, without letting any major spoilers slip, the ending just…wow…


So, friends, do yourself a favor and put the politics away for two hours. Put your life’s worries away. Put away your differences. Enjoy life and enjoy this movie. That’s what La La Land is for. (And if you’re not into musicals, I can’t guarantee you’ll love it, but I hope you do.)


To watch the trailer, click on this link. Happy watching, friends!